326 West Harmont Drive, Phoenix, AZ 85021-5643 | 877-906-1633
  

 Celebrating Our 20th Year 

1821 Antique Historical Map of Berwick-shire Scotland

John Thomson

About The 1821 Antique Historical Map of Berwick-shire Scotland

Published in London by Baldwin and Cradock, this stately map features places of importance and boundaries of the shires.

Berwickshire is a maritime county in the south-east of Scotland, bounded on the north by the German Ocean and the county of Haddington (Eastlothian), on the east and north-east by the German Ocean, on the south by the river Tweed, which separates it from the English county of Northumberland, and on the west and south-west by the counties of Edinburgh (Midlothian) and Roxburgh.  It is about thirty-five miles in length and twenty-two miles in extreme breadth.  It comprises about 446 1/2 square miles or 285,760 acres.  The county derives its name from the ancient town of berwick, formerly the county town. 

Berwickshire was anciently part of the kingdom of Northumbria until the year 1020 when it was ceded to Malcolm II, King of Scotland, by the Earl of Northumberland. From its situation on the borders, the county was the scene of frequent hostilities and an object of continual dispute between the Scots and the English.  The town of Berwick was finally ceded to the English in 1482.  Greenlaw eventually became the county town for Berwickshire.

The county comprises thirty-four parishes and three civil districts of Merse, Lammermoor, and Lauderdale.  It includes the royal burgh of Lauder, the towns of Greenlaw, Dunse, Coldstream, and Eyemouth, and several villages.  The district of Merse is level and extends for nearly twenty miles along the north bank of the Tweed and about ten miles in breadth.  It is richly fertile and enriched with plantations.  The district of Lammermoor, nearly of equal extent and parallel with the Merse, is a hilly tract chiefly adapted for pasture.  The district of Lauderdale, to the west of the other two, is also diversified with hills and affords good pasture for sheep and a coarse breed of black cattle.  It has fertile vales of arable land yielding abundant crops.  The coast is bold and rocky, rising precipitously to a great height, and is almost inaccessible except at Eyemouth and Coldingham Bay.  The population of the county in 1851 was 34,438.

 

Savvy Price $250.00

Gallery Price $350.00

Item Location: Phoenix, AZ
  Shipped To You

  
 
  Pick It Up FREE!  
Add to Cart
Quick Inquiry Email Friend Print
Product Details
Description

Published in London by Baldwin and Cradock, this stately map features places of importance and boundaries of the shires.

Berwickshire is a maritime county in the south-east of Scotland, bounded on the north by the German Ocean and the county of Haddington (Eastlothian), on the east and north-east by the German Ocean, on the south by the river Tweed, which separates it from the English county of Northumberland, and on the west and south-west by the counties of Edinburgh (Midlothian) and Roxburgh.  It is about thirty-five miles in length and twenty-two miles in extreme breadth.  It comprises about 446 1/2 square miles or 285,760 acres.  The county derives its name from the ancient town of berwick, formerly the county town. 

Berwickshire was anciently part of the kingdom of Northumbria until the year 1020 when it was ceded to Malcolm II, King of Scotland, by the Earl of Northumberland. From its situation on the borders, the county was the scene of frequent hostilities and an object of continual dispute between the Scots and the English.  The town of Berwick was finally ceded to the English in 1482.  Greenlaw eventually became the county town for Berwickshire.

The county comprises thirty-four parishes and three civil districts of Merse, Lammermoor, and Lauderdale.  It includes the royal burgh of Lauder, the towns of Greenlaw, Dunse, Coldstream, and Eyemouth, and several villages.  The district of Merse is level and extends for nearly twenty miles along the north bank of the Tweed and about ten miles in breadth.  It is richly fertile and enriched with plantations.  The district of Lammermoor, nearly of equal extent and parallel with the Merse, is a hilly tract chiefly adapted for pasture.  The district of Lauderdale, to the west of the other two, is also diversified with hills and affords good pasture for sheep and a coarse breed of black cattle.  It has fertile vales of arable land yielding abundant crops.  The coast is bold and rocky, rising precipitously to a great height, and is almost inaccessible except at Eyemouth and Coldingham Bay.  The population of the county in 1851 was 34,438.

 

About the Artist John Thomson (1777-circa 1840), was a Scottish cartographer from Edinburgh, celebrated for his 1817 New General Atlas, published by himself in Edinburgh, John Cumming in Dublin, and Baldwin, Cradock, and Joy in London.
Medium Hand-colored engraving
Frame Two PH balanced mat boards, regular glass, two-tone wood molding with beaded sight edge (custom framed)
Frame size 29 " height X 35 1/8" width
Date of creation 1821
Condition Good to fair, as there is mild foxing visible overall.
Provenance ShW